And The Trees Crept In by Dawn Kurtagich

 

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Stay away from the woods…

When Silla and Nori arrive at their aunt’s home, it’s immediately clear that the manor is cursed. The endless creaking of the house at night and the eerie stillness of the woods surrounding them would be enough of a sign, but there are secrets too—questions that Silla can’t ignore: Why does it seem that, ever since they arrived, the trees have been creeping closer? Who is the beautiful boy who’s appeared from the woods? And who is the tall man with no eyes who Nori plays with in the basement at night… a man no one else can see?

(via Goodreads)

 

I adored this book! It was creepy and unsettling. You questioned and questioned as you continued reading, and you wanted to press on to find out the answers. It was a slow reveal (which I love!) and the book used the fonts to create a dual story line.

This story reminded me of the gothic tales from the 18th and 19th centuries. It was visceral without too much gore. The narrator was equal parts unreliable and haunting. I enjoyed the constant wondering if she was telling the truth or she was going crazy.

My only criticism of this one was that the epilogue seemed anti-climatic or superfluous to the narrative.

4/5

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The Merciless (Merciless #1) by Danielle Vega

 

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Brooklyn Stevens sits in a pool of her own blood, tied up and gagged. No one outside of these dank ba sement walls knows she’s here. No one can hear her scream.
 
Sofia Flores knows she shouldn’t have gotten involved. When she befriended Riley, Grace, and Alexis on her first day at school, she admired them, with their perfect hair and their good-girl ways. They said they wanted to save Brooklyn. They wanted to help her. Sofia didn’t realize they believed Brooklyn was possessed.
 
Now, Riley and the girls are performing an exorcism on Brooklyn—but their idea of an exorcism is closer to torture than salvation. All Sofia wants is to get out of this house. But there is no way out. Sofia can’t go against the other girls . . . unless she wants to be next. . . .
 
In this chilling debut, Danielle Vega delivers blood-curdling suspense and terror on every page. By the shockingly twisted end, readers will be faced with the most haunting question of all: Is there evil in all of us?

(via Goodreads)

Mean Girls meets The Exorcist, The Merciless looks at the evil within everyone, and the nature of evil.

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Throughout this entire book, I kept wondering ‘why?’. Why did no one report this? Why did no one thinks this weird? And it was frustrating. The main character of Sofia moves between likable and unlikable. She seemed too naive to be real.

I wanted more from this book. I felt all supporting characters were cardboard cut outs and I wanted to see something more from them too.

2/5

 

 

 

S.T.A.G.S by M.A. Bennett

Nine students. Three bloodsports. One deadly weekend.

S.T.A.G.SIt is the autumn term and Greer MacDonald is struggling to settle into the sixth form at the exclusive St. Aidan the Great boarding school, known to its privileged pupils as S.T.A.G.S. Just when she despairs of making friends Greer receives a mysterious invitation with three words embossed upon on it: huntin’ shootin’ fishin’. When Greer learns that the invitation is to spend the half term weekend at the country manor of Henry de Warlencourt, the most popular and wealthy boy at S.T.A.G.S., she is as surprised as she is flattered.

But when Greer joins the other chosen few at the ancient and sprawling Longcross Hall, she realises that Henry’s parents are not at home; the only adults present are a cohort of eerily compliant servants. The students are at the mercy of their capricious host, and, over the next three days, as the three bloodsports – hunting, shooting and fishing – become increasingly dark and twisted, Greer comes to the horrifying realisation that those being hunted are not wild game, but the very misfits Henry has brought with him from school… 

(via Goodreads)

STAGS was an obvious story, derivative of Skulls and Hard Target. I don’t know whether the author felt enough time had passed (or only old people like me would remember these stories), but I kept waiting for a twist to the story. It never came.

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The main character, Greer, is naive. I didn’t understand why she was so quick to believe Henry was not like the others when everything that was occurring was happening in his home. I also didn’t really believe the obsession with pre-internet days the STAGS people had. They obviously had mod cons and used them.

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I won’t spoil the story but I finished the book feeling ‘come on!!!’ Having said that, some lovely people in my book club really liked this story, so it may just be me 🙂

2.5/5

 

Gemina (Illuminae Files #2) by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

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The saga that began with breakout bestseller Illuminae continues aboard Jump Station Heimdall, where two new characters will confront the next wave of BeiTech’s assault. Hanna is the station commander’s pampered daughter, Nik the reluctant member of a notorious crime family. But while the pair are struggling with the realities of life aboard the galaxy’s most boring space station, little do they know that Kady Grant and the Hypatia are headed right toward Heimdall, carrying news of the Kerenza invasion.

When an elite BeiTech strike team invades the station, Hanna and Nik are thrown together to defend their home. But alien predators are picking off the station crew one by one, and a malfunction in the station’s wormhole means the space-time continuum might be ripped in two before dinner. Soon, Hanna and Nik aren’t just fighting for their own survival; the fate of everyone on the Hypatia—and possibly the known universe—is in their hands.

But relax. They’ve totally got this. They hope.

Told through a compelling dossier of emails, IMs, classified files, transcripts and schematics, Gemina raises the stakes of the Illuminae Files, hurling readers into an enthralling new story that will leave them breathless.

(via Goodreads)

I really enjoyed this book, as much as Illuminae. I think it has a lot to do with the female leads in the stories. Not to say the men aren’t entertaining and relateable, but these books have such a strong female lead that is refreshing compared to some other YA novels I’ve been reading of late (I’m looking at you, Lily from Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares!).

Onto our main Image result for gemina hannah donnellycharacter Hannah Donnelly. The daughter of the Captain, she is thrust into saving her world from infiltrators and a wormhole with it’s own issues. I was very pleased she wasn’t a carbon copy of Kady  Grant (Illuminae). Where Kady was tech-savvy, Hannah has a physicality about her that makes her actions in the book believable.

Her counterpart, Nik Malikov, is an alleged gangster who is always in trouble. But as we expect, there is more to him than meets the eye. Gemina does a good job of unravelling his back story slowly. And I liked the outcome. It wasn’t a cop out, or frustrating.

Kaufman and Kristoff have built an amazing and intricate world for this series. Gemina and Illuminae, though focusing on different characters and ships, do tie in to one another.  And we can’t have a review without mentioning the original text layout, the art work, the dossiers. It makes a very large book a quick read. And it’s always fun to have to turn the book upside down to read the next line 🙂

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I recommend this to lovers of YA and Science Fiction. A well written ‘space opera’ and I am looking forward to Obsidio (what’s going to happen??!!).

4.5/5

The Girl From The Well by Rin Chupeco

18509623You may think me biased, being murdered myself. But my state of being has nothing to do with the curiosity toward my own species, if we can be called such. We do not go gentle, as your poet encourages, into that good night.

A dead girl walks the streets.

She hunts murderers. Child killers, much like the man who threw her body down a well three hundred years ago.

And when a strange boy bearing stranger tattoos moves into the neighborhood so, she discovers, does something else. And soon both will be drawn into the world of eerie doll rituals and dark Shinto exorcisms that will take them from American suburbia to the remote valleys and shrines of Aomori, Japan.

Because the boy has a terrifying secret – one that would just kill to get out.

The Girl from the Well is A YA Horror novel pitched as “Dexter” meets “The Grudge”, based on a well-loved Japanese ghost story.

(via Goodreads)

Rin Chupeco’s Girl From The Well is a much better read than I expected. Based on the original myth that inspired The Ring, GFTW meshes well with the contemporary story line, without becoming another sequel.

Having said that, it wasn’t as scary as I wanted it to be. I wanted to be completely creeped out at the very least, but it didn’t happen. I ended up being more interested in the old Japanese legend the Bancho Sarayashiki.

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One thing that really bugged me about this book was the lack of proofreading – the author said Narrabeen was in Sydney, and Sydney was in Queensland. We’re talking 850km from Queensland to Narrabeen and another 50km-ish from Narrabeen to Sydney. How is that not picked up by the editor? Really frustrating for us down under!

I really enjoyed the way the narrative dropped in and out of lines on the page when Okiku was speaking. And the recollection of falling down the well found the words dropping. That was very cool.

3.5/5

Hellblazer: Original Sins by Jamie Delano, John Ridgway, Alfredo Alcala

John Constantine 133017is an unconcerned, amoral occultist with a British working-class background.He’s an anti-hero who manages to come out on top through a combination of luck, trickery and genuine magic skill.V FOR VENDETTA illustrator David Lloyd provides painted artwork for the tale of an encounter with a strange woman who is the embodiment of the world’s horrors.This volume also features some of Constantine’s earliest adventures including his first victory in the long war with the demon Nergal.

(via Goodreads)

To me, John Constantine is the Generation X anti-hero. The chain-smoking, hard drinking, foul mouthed deuteragonist is one of my favourite characters in the DC universe.

There is something about an anti-hero that is so popular. It is often the character we can most relate to, the most layered, sometimes fun!

Constantine is all those things. He works the dark and light magic, and the end justifies the means. He walks in a world of darkness and pain, and as such, the stories are textured and reflective of that small part of humanity which is denied by most.

The stories are strong and the artwork is Miller-esque. I’d recommend this to anyone who likes a darker story.

4.5/5

Nightlord: Sunset by Garon Whited

I received a free copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Eric didn’t ask to be a vampire. In fact, he didn’t even believe in them. Then he hooks up with a hot babe, wakes up with a hangover, and bites his tongue with his own fangs.

Which pretty much settles the question.

Now he’s trying to hold down his day job while learning the rules of the Undead — the most important being that bloodthirsty urges and predatory instincts are a real bitch.

Upside; Eric has the beautiful Sasha to teach him the ropes, including the magic he’ll need to survive.

Downside; they’re being hunted by members of the Church of Light, who are determined to rid the world of vampires.

(via Goodreads)

This was a nice surprise.

I saw the blurb and the length and I was slightly disheartened.

But what follows is a fluid, engaging narrative.

It’s conversational, imagined, and while at times can seem to jump in the narrative, overall it was a great story for lovers of the genre.

3.5/5